Private View: Thursday 2 April 2020, 6.00-8.00pm

Exhibition continues to Saturday 25 April 2020

Opening Times: Thursday & Friday 10.00- 4.00pm and all other times by arrangement.

Artists' Talk: Saturday 25 April 2020, 4.00pm.

Closing Party: Saturday 25 April 2020, 2.00- 4.00pm.

The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost’s famous poem, is the title of our second exhibition of the year. The exhibition will showcase the work of James Anderson and includes a number of large, colour-dense abstract prints (an inventive combination of aquatint, carborundum and sugar-lift etchings). Like the poem, the works are a rumination on the nature of choice...the sometimes deliberate, sometimes serendipitous choices that we make...in art as in life; and, perhaps, the ways we justify them read more.

James's prints - fluid, organic forms in strong painterly colours that blend and merge and criss cross - seem effortlessly spontaneous, as though created at the speed of brushwork. And herein lies the tension, the essential drama that energises the work. The impression of the impromptu masks the meticulous, studied craftsmanship; the careful, deliberate planning that is at the heart of printmaking and indeed, all artistic choice. But the road the artist must take is always a kind of collaboration between the dictates of the artist and the serendipity of how the work itself evolves in response to those dictates.

James's prints - fluid, organic forms in strong painterly colours that blend and merge and criss cross - seem effortlessly spontaneous, as though created at the speed of brushwork. And herein lies the tension, the essential drama that energises the work. The impression of the impromptu masks the meticulous, studied craftsmanship; the careful, deliberate planning that is at the heart of printmaking and indeed, all artistic choice. But the road the artist must take is always a kind of collaboration between the dictates of the artist and the serendipity of how the work itself evolves in response to those dictates.

And the stories these works tell are, perhaps, the stories of the road James himself took; the early choices that led him away from architecture to medicine, from life drawing to abstract printmaking. Were they the right ones, the ones less travelled, or simply rationalised as such?

These are strong, confident, powerful works. They provoke strong, powerful reactions. But don’t take our word for it. Come and see.